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A Site devoted to XingYi (hsingi), BaGua (pakua) and Tai Chi (taiji).

Bagua Body

An introduction to the body method of BaGua (PaKua) written by Mike Patterson

The BaGua (PaKua) BODY

The most notable characteristic of motion in this art is that motion is constant. There are no fixed stances in the art of Bagua. Everything is done while the practitioner remains in motion. This trait, when executed properly, allows tremendous derivation of power through the dynamics of centrifugal force and acceleration. This simply means that Bagua simultaneously employs constant circular movement to both deflect the enemy arsenal and generate enormous power gained through the perpetual momentum of the palm changes.

The mechanical aspects of generating force in Bagua are considered by many to be the most difficult of the Neijia arts to undertake in study. The combination of continuous motion and articulated force mechanics do present special problems to be sure. But the study of Bagua is a study worthwhile all the same. And if taken step by step, like most things, is attainable.

All things in Bagua begin with the walking of the circle. From this walking, all the art's concepts and strategies proceed. And, of course being so important, even the way in which the practitioner walks is governed. There are three main stepping patterns in Bagua. They are as follows:

  • Shun Pu (Toe Forward)(sometime called the T footwork).
  • Kou Pu (Toe Inward)(sometime called the V footwork).
  • Pai Pu (Toe Outward)(sometime called the Y footwork).

From these basic ways to step, all the complex and amazing foot changes that are the hallmark of the art are possible.

Bagua contains eight primary palm shapes as follows:

Lo Shuan Chang (Drilling Palm), Pi Chang (Spitting Palm), Yang Chang (Upward Palm), Shu Chang (Outward Palm), Fu Chang, (Downward Palm), Tiao Chang (Enticing Palm), Pao Chang (Embracing Palm), Liao Chang (Seizing Palm)

Together, the basics yield some truly astounding combinations of motion. I have listed the names of the postures found in the Lung Hsin(Dragon Heart) Bagua form below for the reader's edification.

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Lung Hsin Bagua

Dragon Heart Bagua

 

A complete listing of each posture within each palm change follows below.

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First Kua

  1. Beginning
  2. Leaning Against Horse To Ask Questions
  3. Hiding Flower Under Leaf
  4. Wild Goose Leaves The Flock
  5. Purple Swallow Fanning Tail
  6. Close The Door To Push Out The Moon
  7. Hiding Flower Under Leaf
  8. Wild Goose Leaving The Flock

Second Kua

  1. Wild Goose Leaves The Flock
  2. Purple Swallow Fanning Tail
  3. Close The Door To Push Out The Moon
  4. Fierce Tiger Leaves The Cage
  5. Pheasant Throwing Wings
  6. Transplanting Flower To The Tree
  7. Removing Helmet From Behind Head
  8. Embracing Moon At The Chest
  9. Hiding Flower Under Leaf
  10. Wild Goose Leaves The Flock

Third Kua

  1. Wild Goose Leaves The Flock
  2. Purple Swallow Fanning Tail
  3. Close The Door To Push Out The Moon
  4. Hawk Whirling Into Sky
  5. White Snake Wrapping The Body
  6. Embracing Moon At The Chest
  7. Jade Maiden Handing In Book
  8. Tai Shan Pressing Down
  9. Black Bear Turns Over On Its Back
  10. Yellow Eagle Ripping The Body
  11. Monkey Picking Fruit
  12. Monkey Sitting In Cave
  13. Unicorn Spits Out The Book
  14. Swallow Skimming the Water
  15. Embracing Moon At The Chest
  16. Hiding Flower Under Leaf
  17. Wild Goose Leaves The Flock

Fourth Kua

  1. Wild Goose Leaves The Flock
  2. Purple Swallow Fanning Tail
  3. Close The Door To Push Out The Moon
  4. Pheasant Throwing Wings
  5. Transplanting Flower To The Tree
  6. Removing Helmet From Behind Head
  7. Clouds Crossing Szechuan Road
  8. Pheasant Throwing Wings
  9. Transplanting Flower To The Tree
  10. Black Dragon Wrapping Waist
  11. Reigning The Running Horse
  12. Walking To Open The Robe
  13. Push The Mountain Into The Sea
  14. Bat Flying Down To The Ground
  15. Swallow Skimming the Water
  16. Embracing Moon At The Chest
  17. Hiding Flower Under Leaf
  18. Wild Goose Leaves The Flock

Fifth Kua

  1. Monkey Steals The Peach
  2. Monkey Offers The Fruit
  3. Big Pong Spreads Its Wings
  4. Crossing Arms To Remove And Embrace
  5. Yield And Push The Clothes
  6. Sweep One Thousand Soldiers
  7. Hawk Turns Over
  8. Pheasants Fighting
  9. Embracing Moon At The Chest
  10. Monkey Steals The Peach

Sixth Kua

  1. Wild Goose Leaves The Flock
  2. Purple Swallow Fanning Tail
  3. Rhinoceros Looks At The Moon
  4. Heavenly Ruler Holds Up The Pagoda
  5. White Snake Spits Out The Mushroom
  6. Fierce Tiger Leaves The Cage
  7. Pheasant Throwing Wings
  8. Transplanting Flower To The Tree
  9. Removing Helmet From Behind Head
  10. Embracing Moon At The Chest
  11. Hiding Flower Under Leaf
  12. Wild Goose Leaves The Flock

Seventh Kua

  1. Hiding Flower Under Leaf
  2. Lion Embracing The Ball
  3. Lion Rolls The Ball
  4. Lion Pouncing On The Ball
  5. Lion Opens Its Mouth
  6. Lion Turning Its Body
  7. Lion Embracing The Ball

Eighth Kua

  1. Heavenly Horse Walks In The Sky
  2. Mount The Horse And Draw The Bow
  3. Golden Snake Coils Around The Willow Tree
  4. Wild Horses Crash Through The Corral
  5. Golden Snake Coils Around The Willow Tree
  6. Wild Horses Crash Through The Corral
  7. Liu Hai Plays With The Toad
  8. Big Python Turns Over On Its Back
  9. Black Bear Thrusts Its Paw
  10. Fierce Tiger Leaves The Cage
  11. Pheasant Throwing Wings
  12. Transplanting Flower To The Tree
  13. Removing Helmet From Behind The Head
  14. Embracing Moon At The Chest
  15. Hiding Flower Under Leaf
  16. Wild Goose Leaves The Flock

The practitioner will complete the full training of one or more circular forms in an effort to cultivate a flexible, fluid yet springy type of movement. At first the training will be very fixed and methodic in terms of going through the various palm changes. As skill is gained, the structures will become more dynamic in terms of fluidity with the practitioner attempting to move the intention swiftly from one shape expression point to another. Eventually, free form practice will be emphasized so that the practitioner is more spontaneous in the execution of the changes. This skill will then be coupled with free form partner practice to escalate the practitioner's sensitivity to minute changes in the opponent's center point in turn creating opportunity for exploitation tactically.